There has been a problem arising that everybody seems to see lately, but still no one seems to understand it completely.

The constant stream of fragmented information on the Internet (i.e., Facebook, Twitter, Netflix, etc.) has seemingly rewired our appetite for all forms of information consumption–and it is tiresome.

As a result of this, I have been constantly skimming texts quickly without giving myself the chance to ponder much as I used to.

Also, the quick fix of on-demand television culture with unlimited options has made me lose interest in reading books and deep thinking.

I have been reacting much and thinking less.

And an honest self-check had shown me that this has negatively impacted my focus–and, therefore, my reality.

The Solution

These past weeks, I have tried going back to books.

I’ve started by reading about effective reading, and I think it has brought me back even just for a little.

I’ve also intentionally drafted a plan for a balanced reading diet which consists a combination of healthy books.

I think this has restored my contemplative habits from before the rise of constant reactive thinking toward random bits of unwarranted information on social media.

But this has been far from easy.

It requires sacrifice

We all have limited time, and the environments we are in are never so favorable.

Because of this, I had to stop doing some things I “loved”.

For instance, I deactivated my Facebook for a time, and playing computer games had to be at a minimum.

“The only people who achieve much are those who want knowledge so badly that they seek it while the conditions are still unfavorable. Favorable conditions never come.” C.S. Lewis

Next Goal: Find Others

Endeavors like this is most beneficial when done with others.

It makes it easier when one is surrounded with other people who have love for reading books.

In line with this, I’ve been thinking about starting a small group dedicated for building each other’s love for learning through reading.

There will be no reading requirements or fixed meeting schedules.

The only qualification of sorts is that you are currently reading a book.

If you think this is something that interests you too, or if you simply want more details about it, please reach out to me on Twitter: @ayoayco or send me an email: ramon.aycojr+reading@gmail.com

“the most famous example is The Inklings, a group started in the 1930s by a handful of friends living in Oxford, England (the two most famous being C. S. Lewis and J. R. R. Tolkien). They gathered to read selections from their own works and then to discuss them. The Inklings model is pretty simple: bring what occupies your mind and read it aloud. Stimulating the minds of others and generating conversation makes it possible to learn from one another.” Tony Reinke, Lit!